Design Purpose

Under the ‘Details’ tab of your Design, there is an entry field for ‘Design Purpose’. This field helps the software identify the different purposes of each design in your project. This is especially important for design improvement purposes.

Ensuring this field is defined accurately also helps populate the GHG Performance Chart for your organisation or personal dashboards which is calculated from the difference between your BAU designs vs Final/Proposed designs. The chart is to help promote friendly competition among organisation members and the wider eToolLCD community. It is also to remind users of the ultimate goal of using LCA – to implement improvement strategies to reduce overall GHG impacts.

Under the ‘Design Purpose’ drop down menu, there are a number of selections to choose from. The meanings for each option are explained in the list below:

Target Setting

The selections with ‘Target Setting’ are specifically for very early stage ‘target setting’ projects. Usually when very little of the design has been finalised or defined do we consider it a ‘Target Setting’ study. The intention for a ‘Target Setting’ study is specifically to provide LCA guidance to identify potential hot-spots which will help direct how the rest of the project will proceed with finalising the design.

Under this category, there are the following options:

  • Target Setting – Business As Usual: for the ‘business-as-usual’ base/reference design of the project
  • Target Setting – Improved: for the ‘improved’ version of the BAU design. Usually recommendations would be modelled and recorded in this design.
  • Target Setting – Scenario: other option/scenario designs that are explored but may not be seriously considered. For example, used for when future/low-carbon grids are modelled as a ‘best case scenario’ option.
  • Target Setting – Final: The ‘final’ design that feature the improvement strategies that are confirmed by the developers/builders to implement for the project. Note that you can only have ONE ‘final’ design in each Structure.

LCA

‘LCA’ options are for projects that have progressed further along the design development stage. Usually the general geometry of the project has been defined or a cost plan is available for budgeting purposes. There will also be early stage drawings and plans available. The intention for a ‘design review’ stage LCA study is to provide more detailed LCA guidance to more accurately identify hot-spots which will help refine the specification decisions for the project as it proceeds towards the final version of the design.

Under this category, there are the following options:

  • LCA – Business As Usual: for the ‘business-as-usual’ base/reference design of the project
  • LCA – Proposed: for the ‘proposed’ version of the design. Improvement strategies that have been identified and implemented would be modelled and recorded in this design. When the LCA is conducted in-house by eTool assessors, this design is usually the client’s proposed version. Note that you can only have ONE ‘Proposed’ design in each Structure.
  • LCA – Improved: the further ‘improved’ version of the Proposed design. Additional improvement strategies would be identified, modelled and recorded in this design. When conducted in-house by eTool assessors, this design is the improved version of the client’s proposed design.
  • LCA – Scenario: other option/scenario designs that are explored but may not be seriously considered. For example, used when future/low-carbon grids are modelled as a ‘best case scenario’ option.
  • LCA – Final: The ‘final’ design that feature the improvement strategies that are confirmed by the developers/builders to implement for the project. Note that you can only have ONE ‘final’ design in each Structure.
  • LCA – Audit: used when conducting an LCA for auditing purposes. Usually based on an existing building and actual bills and monitored data.
  • LCA – As-Built: for LCA of buildings where construction has been completed. Usually very challenging to identify further improvement strategies as the building as already been constructed. More suitable for foot-printing assessments. Note that you can only have ONE ‘As-Built’ design in each Structure.

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